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"Don't be Cruel": Belmont Students React to ELVIS Act



With the rise of artificial intelligence, it’s never been easier to recreate a voice for a song. 

 

But now those real voices are spreading awareness about necessary legislation. 

 

Recently at RCA Studio A, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee introduced the Ensuring Likeness Voice and Image Security Act. 

 

This bill will ensure protection for songwriters, performers and professionals in the music industry from AI  

 

“I think this is a great step forward in terms of protecting the creatives that Tennessee is home to. Having a say and being able to control and protect one’s self and the things one creates is crucial, especially in a city that heavily relies on the music industry,” senior music business major Dalton Becker said.  

 

The music industry in Tennessee provides $5.8 billion towards the Gross Domestic Product and more than 61,617 jobs all over the state.  

 

"We will ensure that no one can steal the voices of Tennessee artists," said Gov. Lee to reporters. "I believe that what we're doing here today will ensure that no one will steal the voices of American artists once this is passed across the country." 

 

The ELVIS Act is the first legislation in the country to add protection of “voice” to laws expressing the inability to use someone’s likeness and has had extremely positive feedback. 

 

“In this high-tech digital age, there’s no way to know if AI is recreating our voices and allowing someone else to use an artist’s name and generate a song. This is identity theft,” said junior commercial voice major Kaelin Kinzer.  

 

Artists at all levels have begun to see their identity taken by AI. Musicians such as Lainey Wilson, Lindsay Ell and Matt Maher attended the announcement of the bill.  

 

“For me personally, this act is a great protective force. Music is already such a difficulty industry to succeed in. This act prevents artificial intelligence from making the battle even tougher for independent artists like myself,” said sophomore commercial music major Avery Calvert.  


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This article was written by Bree Fabbie

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